CIMUN Chronicle / Article / 1994

International Court of Justice Representatives Argue Over The North Sea Continental Shelf Case


IPD Article Image - International Court of Justice Representatives Argue Over The North Sea Continental Shelf Case

Representatives from Slovakia and Uganda in the International Court of Justice (ICJ) have disagreed on which witnesses to call regarding the North Sea Continental Shelf Case in a recent meeting. The North Sea Continental Shelf case, a conflict of territories between Denmark, Germany, and the Netherlands have been brought to the attention of the ICJ in the beginning of April.

The conflict of the North Sea Continental Shelf Case is centered around the territories bordering the North Sea, and how the borders of Germany, Denmark and the Netherlands should be drawn to evenly distribute the amount of rich resources. The states are arguing over which witnesses to hear, as they are only allowed two per day.

“We wanted to bring in someone from the International Law Commission,” said a representative from Slovakia. The court should first question the original laws placed to set precedent for the conflict, according to the representative.

“I wholeheartedly disagree with the sentiments of Slovakia,” said a representative from Uganda. It is far more important to interview Germany or Denmark instead to understand their viewpoints on the matter, according to the representative.

There has not yet been an agreement between the court on who to call as witnesses. However, the decision seems to sway in the favor of West Germany. Solutions for the conflict have not yet been discussed.